Quantcast
Channel: The Maynard Institute for Journalism Education
Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 1378

NABJ's Greg Lee Named SunSentinel Sports Editor

0
0
July 30, 2012

Association president to lead coverage of 4 pro teams; Camille Edwards named news V.P. of WABC; Lori Waldon appointed news director in Sacramento; sending staffers to Olympics no longer automatic; Denver stations pool interviews of Aurora victims; will reinvented Unity address affirmative action?; David Squires joining Sporting News digital efforts (7/30/12)

Association President to Lead Coverage of 4 Pro Teams

Camille Edwards Named News V.P. of WABC

Lori Waldon Appointed News Director in Sacramento

Sending Staffers to Olympics No Longer Automatic

Denver Stations Pool Interviews of Aurora Victims

Will Reinvented Unity Address Affirmative Action?

David Squires Joining Sporting News Digital Efforts

Short Takes

Camille Edwards Named News V.P. of WABC

"Camille Edwards, vice president of news at WRC Washington, has been named Camille Edwardsvice president of news at WABC New York," Michael Malone reported Monday for Broadcasting & Cable. "Edwards has been at WRC since 2008, following a news director stint at WMAQ Chicago from 2003 to 2008.

"It's a return to ABC for Edwards, who was assistant news director at WPVI Philadelphia from 1997 to 2003, and executive producer at WLS Chicago from 1993 to 1997.

"Camille Edwards's proven commitment to excellence in local TV news, along with her innovative work expanding news content to new-media platforms, made her the ideal choice for the top news post at WABC,' said Dave Davis, WABC-TV president and general manager. . . ."

New York is the nation's largest television market; Washington ranks eighth.

Lori Waldon Appointed News Director in Sacramento

Lori Waldon, news director at WISN-TV in Milwaukee, has been appointed news director at two Hearst stations in Sacramento, Calif., Duane Dudek reported Tuesday for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. She succeeds Anzio Williams, newly named vice president of news at NBC-owned WCAU-TV in Philadelphia.

Lori Waldon"According to a release from the station 'Waldon's promotion is a result of her outstanding job performance leading the news team during her tenure' at WISN-TV. While here she oversaw the station's news coverage . . . of some of biggest local stories including the Green Bay Packers Super Bowl run, the budget battle in Madison and the recall election," Dudek wrote.

"WISN-TV is locked in a [pitched] battle for news ratings supremacy with WTMJ-TV (Channel 4). . . . A national search will be conducted to find her replacement. Whoever they hire could have his or her hands full. The station's 10 p.m. newscasts lost about 50,000 viewers during its week long blackout on Time Warner Cable . . ."

Mark Glover added Monday in the Sacramento Bee, "Waldon previously served as assistant news director at Sacramento stations Channel 13 (KOVR) and Channel 31 (KMAX). She also spent 13 years in news management at KPIX-TV in San Francisco, serving as managing editor, executive producer and news producer."

The Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto television market is ranked No. 20 in size; Milwaukee is No. 34.

Zoe Smith, Great Britain's weightlifting poster girl, is among the black athlete

Sending Staffers to Olympics No Longer Automatic

"Staffing the Olympics used to be a no-brainer for major newspapers. The Games are a major worldwide event and you air-mail as many reporters as possible," Ed Sherman wrote Monday for the Sherman Report.

"I was among 15 staffers for the Chicago Tribune during the 2000 Games in Sydney.

"Obviously, times, priorities, and most importantly, economics have changed. It's no longer automatic to send an army of staffers to cover an Olympics.

"In fact, the Philadelphia Daily News and Inquirer initially decided skip the trip to London. They returned the five credentials issued to the papers. However, at the last minute, the editors decided to send Phil Sheridan.

". . . On the other side of the spectrum, there's the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. The Times isn't cutting back. It has 13 staffers in London. Times isn't cutting back. It has 13 staffers in London. Dave Morgan, senior VP for content and editor in chief for the USA Today sports media group, noted the staffing breakdown: 'We have about 48 reporters/editors, about 20 photographers, 11 attached to video and 5 for office administration and support (which includes circulation of our International edition). . . ."

Denver Stations Pool Interviews of Aurora Victims

"Kevin Torres is a multimedia journalist for KUSA-TV, the NBC station in Denver," Al Tompkins wrote Friday for the Poynter Institute. "Usually he shoots, writes and edits his own stories.

"On Tuesday, the key interview in his story was shot by the ABC station in town. On Wednesday, the Fox affiliate shot the interview for his story.

"What began as a routine way for Denver stations to share the most Kevin Torresmundane coverage of everyday press conferences and staged events has turned into a way for victims of last week's theater shooting, and their families, to do one TV interview rather than dozens.

" 'The rules that we operate under are that a station can't even look over what they shot until they feed it out to everybody,' Torres told me by email. 'You can't post it online, you can't write about it until everybody in the pool has it.'

"The stations started pooling coverage in 2009 when KUSA and KMGH agreed to share a news helicopter.

"While journalists, of course, would like to do their own interviewing, Torres said the pool system is easier on the families."

Will Reinvented Unity Address Affirmative Action?

"Like the Olympics, it happens every four years. But you won't see a lot of spandex at the convention of minority journalists called Unity, happening this week in Las Vegas," Emil Guillermo wrote Monday in his blog for the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

"You won't see a lot of black journalists either.

"Unless they're gay.

Emil Guillermo". . . For the first time, the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), will not be at Unity. It chose to pull out of the major confab and stage its own convention earlier this year. It leaves just the Asian, Hispanic, and Native American journalists of color to unify in the desert with their new full partner, the gay, lesbian, transgender journalists of the National Lesbian [&] Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA).

". . . Considering the Supreme Court in October will take up the biggest threat to affirmative action in years, I'm surprised I'm hearing little discussion about that issue in the pre-convention buzz.

". . . more than ever before, we really need unity, especially on an issue like affirmative action. This time around, anti-affirmative action forces are using Asian Americans as a wedge to end the policy. Even without real advocacy on the issue, more stories about this would surely help inform the public prior to the Supreme Court argument on October 10.

"But if the NABJ/Unity split is a harbinger, it seems like we're all intent on dividing and conquering ourselves."

David Squires Joining Sporting News Digital Efforts

David Squires, a veteran of several news organizations, including the New York Times and the Black Voices website, which he edited,David Squires is joining the Sporting News as an assistant managing editor who will work on the publication's digital efforts, Editor in Chief Garry D. Howard told Journal-isms on Tuesday.

"We're trying to take it to the digital world," Howard said of the Sporting News. But the digital space also needs experienced journalists, "and David has experience like no other." The publication has developed an iPad app that is "a daily sports section on your iPad," linking to non-Sporting News content as well, and Squires will be working with that, Howard said. It publishes at 5 a.m., and Squires will be working at night, based in Charlotte, N.C.

Squires is a columnist at the Daily Press in Newport News, Va., and was previously a sports columnist and then an urban affairs reporter there. He was laid off in 2008, leaving the Daily Press with no black reporters. He was soon brought back as a news columnist working as a part-time employee. Squires is also a middle-school English teacher in Norfolk and owns a time-share business. 

He has also worked at the Plain Dealer in Cleveland; the Star-Telegram in Fort Worth, Texas; Newsday; the Detroit Free Press; the Telegraph in Macon, Ga.; and the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times, now the Tampa Bay Times.

Short Takes

Follow Richard Prince on Twitter

Facebook users: "Like" "Richard Prince's Journal-isms" on Facebook.

Follow Richard Prince on Twitter @princeeditor

Facebook users: "Like" "Richard Prince's Journal-isms" on Facebook.



read more


Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 1378

Latest Images

Trending Articles