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Ta-Nehisi Coates Wins MacArthur "Genius" Grant

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September 29, 2015

Foundation gives 24 recipients $625,000 over five years (9/29/15); Asian immigrants to outpace blacks, Latinos; Online News Association honors Dori Maynard; despite accolades, pope's visit left Indian unsatisfied; N.Y. Daily News cuts could mean end of tabloid era; optics of Trump's ouster of Ramos weren't all accidental; The Nation publishes "Case Against the Roberts Court"; Radio One invests in casino to reverse millions in losses; Giago still argues for "Indian" over "Native American"; Cecilia Vaisman dies at 54, "such a radio genius" (9/28/15)

 

Foundation Gives 24 Recipients $625,000 Over Five Years

Asian Immigrants to Outpace Blacks, Latinos

Online News Association Honors Dori Maynard

Despite Accolades, Pope's Visit Left Indian Unsatisfied

N.Y. Daily News Cuts Could Mean End of Tabloid Era

Optics of Trump's Ouster of Ramos Weren't All Accidental

The Nation Publishes "The Case Against the Roberts Court"

Radio One Invests in Casino to Reverse Millions in Losses

"Close watchers of Radio One, the national network of radio and television stations aimed at black and urban consumers, [know] the company has had a rocky stretch in recent years,"Jonathan O'Connell reported Friday for the Washington Post.

"With its radio stations struggling in some markets, the company lost nearly $32 million in six months ending in June. It lost $13 million alone in the second quarter. Radio One's stock has been trading at a little over $2.50 per share this week, a far cry from its pre-recession value.

"But help may be on the way, in the form of the $1.3 billion MGM casino resort under construction at National Harbor.

"In order to win a license for the National Harbor casino, MGM Resorts International was required to bring on minority-owned businesses as ownership partners. James J. Murren, MGM chief executive, said he was introduced to Radio One founder Cathy Hughes by an MGM board member, former U.S. Labor secretary Alexis M. Herman.

"The meeting led to Hughes and her son, Alfred C. Liggins III, who now runs the company, investing $40 million in the project in return for a potentially lucrative cut of revenues. The stake amounts to about 3.1 percent of the total project cost.

"'Alfred and his mom own more than I do,' Murren said. . . ."

Giago Still Argues for "Indian" Over "Native American"

Tim Giago

Tim Giago, editor emeritus of Native Sun News and founding president of the Native American Journalists Association, has long argued for use of the term "American Indian" over "Native American." He returned to the subject in the Sept. 23 edition of Native Sun News.

"The choice of 'Native American' came into vogue in the late 1970s because there were those who objected to the word 'Indian' never knowing that 'Indian' was the Spanish version of 'Indios'[,] a name some would translate to mean a shortened version of 'Niño’s de Indios' or 'Children of God.' As the name traveled north it slowly went from Indios to Indian and no, Columbus was not so stupid that he thought he landed in India or the West Indies. . . ."

Giago also wrote, "In this world of political correctness, it is a shame that the identity of a people who have always called themselves Indians [is] now left in a state of confused identities. Enos Poor Bear, former president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, said many years ago, 'I was born an Indian and I will die an Indian.'

"If the mainstream media wants to change our identity they should at least consult with the thousands of Indian elders who still call themselves 'Indians.' And in the meantime Indian newspapers and radio stations should take the advice we just offered and ask their own tribal elders what name they prefer to be called. We are probably engaged in a losing battle because the national media has far more influence that we do, but at least in most cases we will used the term 'Indian' when we feel it is appropriate. . . ."

Cecilia Vaisman Dies at 54, "Such a Radio Genius"

"Award-winning journalist and multimedia producer Cecilia Vaisman, who brought the pressing issues of her native Latin America to the forefront of radio audiences in the United States through her passionate style of storytelling [accessible via search engine], died Sunday after a battle with breast cancer, according to her colleagues,"Tony Briscoe reported Sunday for the Chicago Tribune. "She was 54.

"Vaisman, who earned two Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards for reporting on the disadvantaged, among numerous other commendations, had her radio documentaries broadcast on WBEZ's 'This American Life,' National Public Radio's 'All Things Considered' and 'Latino USA,' and other outlets.

"'She was such a radio genius,' said Alan Weisman, co-founder of Homelands Productions, an independent media cooperative. 'She was not only a good reporter working for radio, but her work was very richly produced. It was like setting news to music with lots of sound interwoven. She was a master at that.'

"Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and raised in northern New Jersey, Vaisman was the youngest of four children. She earned a degree in Latin American studies from Barnard College in New York City and later joined the staff of NPR in Washington as a producer in 1986. . . ."

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