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    February 8, 2016

    Service in Harlem sanctuary has feel of NABJ meeting; NYU J-students say they were profiled at Rubio event; critic gives CBS "solid grade" for Super Bowl 50 coverage; officials urge change after ProPublica-Daily News report; more exonerated in 2015 than in any other year; Mexicans search for kidnapped reporter, a mother of two; "the mother of all ethnic publications lists" compiled; McCauley leaves Cincy Enquirer for dducation advocacy; Texas tabloid backs off from publishing police addresses (2/8/16)

    Service in Harlem Sanctuary Has Feel of NABJ Meeting

    NYU J-Students Say They Were Profiled at Rubio Event

    Critic Gives CBS "Solid Grade" for Super Bowl 50 Coverage

    Officials Urge Change After ProPublica-Daily News Report

    Mexicans Search for Kidnapped Reporter, a Mother of Two

    N.Y. Times Launches Spanish-Language Edition

    "The Mother of All Ethnic Publications Lists" Compiled

    McCauley Leaves Cincy Enquirer for Education Advocacy

    "I’m not good at goodbyes," associate opinion editor Byron McCauley wrote Friday in the Cincinnati Enquirer.

    "I'm moving on from The Enquirer to work in education advocacy in Connecticut with the promise of helping all kids have access to a high-quality public education.

    "My mom was a public school teacher who gave her heart and soul to her students, including food, clothing, toiletries and love. All children need this before they can learn. Those challenges continue today, in every city in America. And, sadly, zip codes too often determine whether a kid succeeds or fails. So, I'm all in.

    "Fourteen years ago, during my first full weekend in Cincinnati, I witnessed the implosion of Riverfront Stadium. The site where sports memories were made was gone in an instant. And, today, that space is electric in a different way: a new stadium, restaurants, apartments and public spaces with clean river views. That was only the beginning. The story of the Cincinnati renaissance is not finished, but what I have witnessed is extraordinary.

    "This is also a city and region full of warts that I hope will fade over time. People of goodwill are working on reducing poverty and homelessness. And, the city of Cincinnati and the business community are rightly focusing on economic inclusion and empowerment that can lead to wealth-building. When I moved here, Cincinnati was under an economic boycott in the aftermath of a white officer killing an unarmed black man and days of racial unrest. Today, Cincinnati is playing catch-up but beginning to make real progress.

    "A transformation of bricks and mortar, and hearts and minds. . . ."

    Texas Tabloid Backs Off From Publishing Police Addresses

    "A little-known Texas tabloid threatened to publish the names and addresses of every San Antonio police officer — as retaliation for a controversial officer-involved shooting — only to back off one day later after national outrage," Jason Silverstein reported Monday for the Daily News in New York.

    "San Antonio Observer editor and publisher Stephanie Zarriello likened local cops to Klansmen and sex offenders in a Saturday press conference, announcing her paper's plan in response to the death of Antronie Scott, an unarmed black man.

    "'Like Ku Klux Klansman with hoods, they do everything that they can in order to protect their identities for fear of being brought to justice,' Zarriello said, referring to San Antonio police.

    "She said her paper was 'looking into the future prospects' of listing info for every single San Antonio cop, 'just as the names and addresses of sex offenders are publicized in order to protect the community from their wicked behavior.'

    "Her plan did not go over so well. . . ."

     

    Follow Richard Prince on Twitter @princeeditor


    Facebook users: "Like""Richard Prince's Journal-isms" on Facebook.

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    February 10, 2016

    NBC's Welker often "the only black woman in the room"; columnists turn attention to deadly football head injuries; . . and others to critics of Beyonce's halftime show; Ferguson urged to end "game of chicken" with Justice Dept.; reporter's own lead problem led to 20-part series; Fusion says it is a majority-minority company; Mexican journalist, mother of two, found dead; rival Pakistani media cooperate to protect one another (2/10/16)

    NBC's Welker Often "the Only Black Woman in the Room"

    Columnists Turn Attention to Deadly Football Head Injuries

    . . . And Others to Critics of Beyoncé's Halftime Show

    Ferguson Urged to End "Game of Chicken" With Justice Dept.

    Reporter's Own Lead Problem Led to 20-Part Series

    Fusion Says It Is a Majority-Minority Company

    Mexican Journalist, Mother of Two, Found Dead

    Rival Pakistani Media Cooperate to Protect One Another

    "Afzal Mughal, a Pakistani journalist from a small newspaper in Quetta, the capital of the Balochistan province, was abducted, in the early morning of November, by a group of armed men who broke into his home while he was asleep,"Chia Lun Huang wrote Tuesday for World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

    "Normally, stories like this don't make the front pages in Pakistan, which ranks as the sixth deadliest country for journalists according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

    "But the new 'Editors for Safety' initiative made all the difference. Instead of letting the case go by unnoticed, a message went out to a new Whatsapp group for Pakistani Editors, informing them of the kidnapping. In less than five minutes, 21 television channels were running the story. Its widespread dissemination even had international broadcasters, such as NBC, pick up the news.

    "'Within half an hour, he was back home, albeit badly battered,' [Dawn editor ZaffarAbbas, one of the key conveners of the group, told the World Editors Forum. 'The government was rattled and the home security department stepped in to inquire.'

    "Formed in 2015 with the support of the Open Society Foundation, 'Editors for Safety' has a single philosophy: An attack on one journalist is an attack on the whole industry. . . ."

    read more


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    February 12, 2016

    Co-moderator asks Democrats about white people; Obama live from Illinois on CNN, MSNBC, but not Fox; ex-Mexican president laughs at Trump plan for border wall; NYPD to act after story on barring people from own homes; media begin to cover police killings of Native Americans; . . . stories about Native Americans rare, stereotypical; CNN International Desk staffers must reapply for jobs; Mizzou "town hall" asks white reporters to leave; parents of ex-Little Leaguers sue ESPN, name Smith; should Al Jazeera America have been an app instead? (2/12/16)

    Journal-isms will be on hiatus until further notice.

    Co-Moderator Asks Democrats About White People

    Obama Live From Illinois on CNN, MSNBC but Not Fox

    Ex-Mexican President Laughs at Trump Plan for Border Wall

    NYPD to Act After Story on Barring People From Own Homes

    Media Begin to Cover Police Killings of Native Americans

    . . . Stories About Native Americans Rare, Stereotypical

    Parents of Ex-Little Leaguers Sue ESPN, Name Smith

    "Parents of former Little Leaguers from Jackie Robinson West filed a lawsuit Thursday against Little League International, ESPN and officials from the local league, alleging, among other things, that they profited off the disgraced team while knowing of its ineligible players,"David Matthews and Mark Konkol reported Thursday for dnainfo.com.

    "The lawsuit by Jackie Robinson West's former coach Darold Butler and other team parents also names former league president Bill Haley, Evergreen Park whistleblower Chris Janes, the suburban Little League Janes represents and ESPN commentator Stephen A. Smith.

    "The complaint says Butler and other team officials were diligent submitting boundary maps and player addresses throughout the team's captivating 2014 run, which they allege Little League publicized for their gain without making parents aware the team fielded ineligible players who lived outside JRW boundaries.

    "Jackie Robinson West won the U.S. Little League title in 2014, but it was stripped last year after Little League International ruled JRW officials allowed ineligible players to make the roster. The complaint filed Thursday falls on the anniversary of JRW's title stripping. . . ."

    Matthews and Konkol also wrote, "The lawsuit also alleges ESPN defamed Butler and others by saying they fabricated residency documents and deliberately assembled JRW's ineligible team. The lawsuit specifically names ESPN personality Stephen A. Smith, who said on national television that Butler 'threw' his players 'into the wind.'

    "An ESPN spokesman did not have an immediate comment. . . ."

    Should Al Jazeera America Have Been an App Instead?

    "In January, the deep-pocketed Al Jazeera Media Network announced the shutdown of its United States cable news channel, Al Jazeera America (AJA),"Joe Mohen, a digital media entrepreneur, wrote Friday for Broadcasting & Cable.

    "Industry pundits have found a range of reasons for the meltdown: internal disputes, discrimination, racism, bias, and even the decline of its price of oil. All of these explanations are wrong. AJA failed for one reason: It had a fatally flawed strategy. The network is textbook example of a business with an excellent product that still failed, entirely because it chose the wrong distribution channel.

    "When AJA launched in 2013, it was already too late to launch a new cable channel. Cable is in permanent, irreversible, secular decline. Just as launching a successful new magazine is almost impossible nowadays, so too is launching a new cable brand. Had it been distributed as an app like Netflix, it would have likely succeeded and became the first big 24-hour OTT network backed by a linear TV company. But Al Jazeera hired the wrong advisers and consultants, dinosaurs who did not see fundamental shifts. . . ."

    read more


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    February 13, 2016

    Acel MooreLongtime Philly columnist was left paralyzed in 2010 (2/13/16); Gwen Ifill wins in candidates' debate; Obama live from Illinois on CNN, MSNBC, but not Fox; ex-Mexican president laughs at Trump plan for border wall; NYPD to act after story on barring people from own homes; media begin to cover police killings of Native Americans; . . . stories about Native Americans rare, stereotypical; CNN International Desk staffers must reapply for jobs; Mizzou "town hall" asks white reporters to leave; parents of ex-Little Leaguers sue ESPN, name Smith; should Al Jazeera America have been an app instead? (2/12/16)

    Journal-isms will be on hiatus until further notice.

    Longtime Philly Columnist Was Left Paralyzed in 2010

    Mizzou "Town Hall" Asks White Reporters to Leave

    "A 'Concerned Town Hall' meeting advertised to 'black students and students of color' at the University of Missouri on Wednesday turned out to be less-than-inclusive to white reporters attempting to cover the event,"Jennifer Kabbany reported Friday for the College Fix, which describes itself as"a news and commentary site dedicated to higher education news."

    "The gathering was organized by Concerned Student 1950, which led protests on campus last fall accusing the institution of racism; it describes itself as seeking the 'liberation of all BLACK collegiate students' on Twitter.

    "As the meeting began Wednesday night inside the A. P. Green Chapel at the public university, a student organizer announced: 'If there are any reporters in here, can you please exit? That was my nice warning.'

    "That according to a video of the event taken by Mark Schierbecker, a student at the school and freelance videographer who contributes to The College Fix.

    "His video shows a white male reporter from the mainstream city newspaper, The Columbia Tribune, introduced himself and say 'we will definitely respect your privacy. Just curious, um — why are you guys afr — why are you guys asking us to leave? …'

    "'Um, just because I asked you to,' came the reply. 'We just want to discuss some things.'

    "'Sure, OK, that's totally fine,' the reporter replied, handing over his business card before he exited the chapel. Two white females also left the room.

    "Schierbecker, however, politely declined to leave, repeating 'my personal preference is to stay.' . . ."

    "The town hall ended promptly within minutes of starting when students decided to relocate the forum to a more private location."

    Parents of Ex-Little Leaguers Sue ESPN, Name Smith

    "Parents of former Little Leaguers from Jackie Robinson West filed a lawsuit Thursday against Little League International, ESPN and officials from the local league, alleging, among other things, that they profited off the disgraced team while knowing of its ineligible players,"David Matthews and Mark Konkol reported Thursday for dnainfo.com.

    "The lawsuit by Jackie Robinson West's former coach Darold Butler and other team parents also names former league president Bill Haley, Evergreen Park whistleblower Chris Janes, the suburban Little League Janes represents and ESPN commentator Stephen A. Smith.

    "The complaint says Butler and other team officials were diligent submitting boundary maps and player addresses throughout the team's captivating 2014 run, which they allege Little League publicized for their gain without making parents aware the team fielded ineligible players who lived outside JRW boundaries.

    "Jackie Robinson West won the U.S. Little League title in 2014, but it was stripped last year after Little League International ruled JRW officials allowed ineligible players to make the roster. The complaint filed Thursday falls on the anniversary of JRW's title stripping. . . ."

    Matthews and Konkol also wrote, "The lawsuit also alleges ESPN defamed Butler and others by saying they fabricated residency documents and deliberately assembled JRW's ineligible team. The lawsuit specifically names ESPN personality Stephen A. Smith, who said on national television that Butler 'threw' his players 'into the wind.'

    "An ESPN spokesman did not have an immediate comment. . . ."

    Should Al Jazeera America Have Been an App Instead?

    "In January, the deep-pocketed Al Jazeera Media Network announced the shutdown of its United States cable news channel, Al Jazeera America (AJA),"Joe Mohen, a digital media entrepreneur, wrote Friday for Broadcasting & Cable.

    "Industry pundits have found a range of reasons for the meltdown: internal disputes, discrimination, racism, bias, and even the decline of its price of oil. All of these explanations are wrong. AJA failed for one reason: It had a fatally flawed strategy. The network is textbook example of a business with an excellent product that still failed, entirely because it chose the wrong distribution channel.

    "When AJA launched in 2013, it was already too late to launch a new cable channel. Cable is in permanent, irreversible, secular decline. Just as launching a successful new magazine is almost impossible nowadays, so too is launching a new cable brand. Had it been distributed as an app like Netflix, it would have likely succeeded and became the first big 24-hour OTT network backed by a linear TV company. But Al Jazeera hired the wrong advisers and consultants, dinosaurs who did not see fundamental shifts. . . ."

    read more


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    R.E. Graswich
    February 15, 2016

    Review

    Like thousands of entrepreneurs from Silicon Valley to Shanghai, Robert Abbott started modestly, alone in a tiny room with a card table and kitchen chair. But Abbott’s engine of invention wasn’t a laptop — it was a used typewriter. And his inspiration didn’t create a new killer app but something far more disruptive — a voice for African Americans and a relentless drive for civil rights and equality.

    Like thousands of entrepreneurs from Silicon Valley to Shanghai, Robert Abbott started modestly, alone in a tiny room with a card table and kitchen chair. But Abbott’s engine of invention wasn’t a laptop — it was a used typewriter. And his inspiration didn’t create a new killer app but something far more disruptive — a voice for African Americans and a relentless drive for civil rights and equali

    [Read more]

    Review

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  • 02/14/16--14:19: American Public Media
  • Fellowship, American RadioWorks
    Posted on: 
    February 14, 2016
    Deadline: 
    February 23, 2016

    Are you an audio nerd? Like to listen to podcasts in your sleep? Digest the news with your breakfast? You should be part of the team that produces American RadioWorks, one of best documentary radio outlets in the world. You'll get to help producers and reporters find great guests and do background research for reporting trips. You'll also pitch ideas for our weekly podcast and transcribe interviews from the field. This fellowship position will assist with the production of radio, podcast and web projects at American RadioWorks, the national documentary unit of American Public Media.

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    Professional exchange program in Germany
    Posted on: 
    February 14, 2016
    Deadline: 
    March 1, 2016

    The Arthur F. Burns Fellowship Program Details:
     
    American journalists have until March 1, 2016, to apply for a professional exchange program in Germany. Successful applicants will spend August and September living, working and reporting for their home and host news organizations from across the Atlantic.
     

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    Event Date(s): 
    03/06/2016 - 15:00 - 18:00
    Category: 
    Film Screening

    “Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China” will screen at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 6, at the Oakland Asian Cultural Center. The film was co-created by Paula Madison, a retired NBCUniversal executive and co-chair of the Maynard Institute board of directors. Madison will be at the screening to discuss the film and her search for her Chinese roots. The cultural center is located at 388 9th St., Suite 290, in Oakland. To reserve a seat call 510-763-0370.


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    Internships
    Posted on: 
    February 28, 2016
    Deadline: 
    March 16, 2016

    Position Summary:

    Our internships are opportunities for broadcasting/journalism students or recent graduates to learn the real-world demands of working in an award-winning public media newsroom. We aim to provide a meaningful experience for the intern and SCPR and are seeking interns interested in radio news production, talk shows, digital news, data analysis or interactive news applications.

    We'll be hiring four full-time interns for a 10-week stint. The pay is $12 an hour.

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    Brenda Payton
    March 11, 2016

    By Brenda Payton

    I was in a meeting with Bob Maynard. It must have been in the early ’80s. When he took over as editor of the Oakland Tribune, he was the first African American to lead a mainstream daily newspaper. But that wasn’t the topic of discussion at the meeting.

    “You know, one day people will not be getting their news from newspapers,” he said, holding up a Tribune. “They’ll be reading it on their computers.” 

    Even 30-plus years later, I remember his words. We looked at him as if he were crazy. No newspapers? News on the computer? What was he talking about? (I thought he might have mentioned the word “Internet.” But looking back, his observation predated common references to that term, first used in 1982, according to infoplease.com.)

    [read more]

    I was in a meeting with Bob Maynard. It must have been in the early ’80s. When he took over as editor of the Oakland Tribune, he was the first African American to lead a mainstream daily newspaper. But that wasn’t the topic of discussion at the meeting.

    “You know, one day people will not be getting their news from newspapers,” he said, holding up a Tribune. “They’ll be reading it on their computers.” 

    read more


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    MIJE Staff
    April 1, 2016

    Book CoverWoody Lewis, essayist and former web architect for the Maynard Institute, has just published "Three Lost Souls: Stories about race, class and loneliness," as a Kindle Ebook.

    Book CoverWoody Lewis, essayist and former web architect for the Maynard Institute, has just published "Three Lost Souls: Stories about race, class and loneliness," as a Kindle Ebook.


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    MIJE Staff
    April 17, 2016

    Maynard board member Dorothy Gilliam will be honored by the Anne O'Hare McCormick Memorial Fund as the recipient of the organization's first Anne O'Hare McCormick Trailblazer award. Gilliam will receive the award at an April 18 reception in Washington DC. - MIJE Staff

    Dorothy Butler Gilliam will receive our first Anne O'Hare McCormick Trailblazer Award. She was the first African-american female reporter hired by the Washington Post, joining the paper's City Desk staff in October 1961. She was an Anne O'Hare McCormick Scholar at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism for 1960-1961. During her long career with The Washington Post, she wrote an influential column on education, race and politics for the Metro section. Beyond her byline, she became known as an activist. Gilliam helped to organize protests against the New York Daily News after it fired two-thirds of its African-American staff. She was the president of the National Association of Black Journalists from 1993 to 1995. In 1997, she created the Young Journalists Development Program at The Washington Post. She is a co-founder of The Maynard Institute in Oakland, California, which has trained over 2,000 journalists of color since the 1970s. In 2003-2004, she joined The George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs as the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Fellow. She also launched Prime Movers Media, the nation's first mentorship program for underserved students at urban schools.

    --

    The AOM Memorial Fund as established in 1954 as a posthumous tribute to Anne O'Hare McCormick of The New York Times by her colleagues in the Newswomen's Club of New York.

    Maynard board member Dorothy Gilliam will be honored by the Anne O'Hare McCormick Memorial Fund as the recipient of the organization's first Anne O'Hare McCormick Trailblazer award. Gilliam will receive the award at an April 18 reception in Washington DC. - MIJE Staff

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    MIJE Staff
    April 24, 2016

    At the Oakland Voices community forum on affordable housing earlier this month, expert panelists offered an unusually optimistic view of ways to secure affordable housing in Oakland, in spite of the city’s housing crisis. Strategies ranged from constructing housing for teachers, securing impact fees from developers to fund affordable housing and linking livable wages to issues of housing. The panel made it clear that the city has many tools to accommodate its working class families and residents.

    At the Oakland Voices community forum on affordable housing earlier this month, expert panelists offered an unusually optimistic view of ways to secure affordable housing in Oakland, in spite of the city’s housing crisis. Strategies ranged from constructing housing for teachers, securing impact fees from developers to fund affordable housing and linking livable wages to issues of housing. The panel made it clear that the city has many tools to accommodate its working class families and residents.

    read more


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    MIJE Staff
    May 4, 2016

    The Center for Investigative Reporting and The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education are pleased to announce the launch of theDori J. Maynard Senior Research Fellows program.

    Continuing and deepening the work of both organizations, the program is designed to bring together researchers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines to examine the intersection of race, power and media. Their research will be a resource for media organizations, academic institutions, foundations and others.

    The program is named for Dori J. Maynard, the late president and CEO of the Maynard Institute who worked tirelessly to push the news media to accurately reflect the diversity of the nation. She died Feb. 24, 2015 in her home in Oakland, CA after a battle with cancer.

    She was 56.

    The fellowship will be led by Lindsay Green-Barber, Ph.D., CIR’s director of strategic research.

    We are pleased to announce the first cohort of senior fellows:

    • Meredith Clark, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Mayborn School of Journalism at University of North Texas and a graduate of the Maynard Media Academy for managers.

    • Jana Diesner, Ph.D., assistant professor at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign’s iSchool and affiliate at the Department of Computer Science.

    • Laura K. Nelson, Ph.D., postdoctoral research fellow in the Management and Organizations Department in the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and affiliate at the Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems. In September, Nelson will become an assistant professor in Northeastern University’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

    Joaquin Alvarado, CEO of CIR, said, “We are excited to collaborate with the Maynard Institute to honor and extend the legacy of leadership, learning and courage the institute has provided in journalism. I can think of no better way to celebrate Dori than by pursuing the mission she was so dedicated to. CIR is committed to these principles and values and models them every day we come to work.”

    “We admire the work and the leadership of The Center for Investigative Reporting, and we are thrilled to be partners with them in advancing innovative research and thoughtful discussion of  race, power and media,” said Evelyn Hsu, executive director of the Maynard Institute.

    Maynard board member Martin G. Reynolds said, “This research collaboration with CIR reflects a new strategy for an invigorated institute that seeks to develop research that shows, unequivocally, the value of achieving diversity in staffing, coverage and revenue.”

    Of the senior research fellowship initiative, Jonathan Kaufman, director of Northeastern University’s School of Journalism, said, “This project demonstrates the growing intersection of data, data analysis and journalism. Collaboration between universities, nonprofits like CIR and the Maynard institute and media partners is the future of deeply-reported, high-impact journalism. Northeastern is proud to be at the cutting edge of this new field.”

    Starting this month, CIR and the Maynard Institute will host a series of Equity Exchanges with key stakeholders and potential collaborators to discuss the project and get feedback on research questions the fellows will examine.

    The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education is the nation’s oldest organization dedicated to helping the news media accurately portray all segments of society, particularly those often overlooked, such as communities of color. The institute has been the pre-eminent organization working to support journalists of color, while pushing newsrooms across the nation to achieve diversity in coverage, hiring and business. The organization is coming out of a strategic planning process to reimagine itself to serve media in the 21st century. Part of that service centers on research to help support the need for diversity and equity in media.

    Founded in 1977, The Center for Investigative Reporting is the nation’s first independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization dedicated to public service journalism. CIR empowers the public through groundbreaking investigative storytelling that sparks action, improves lives and protects our democracy. Over the last three years, CIR has convened academic researchers, media makers and others to undertake collaborative research projects and advance the field.

    The announcement of this collaboration coincides with the anniversary of the Washington, D.C., memorial honoring Dori Maynard. Hundreds gathered at the Newseum on May 4, 2015, to remember her as a champion of diversity and a friend and mentor to many. This fellowship is a tribute to her memory and her work.

    The Center for Investigative Reporting and The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education are pleased to announce the launch of theDori J. Maynard Senior Research Fellows program.

    Continuing and deepening the work of both organizations, the program is designed to bring together researchers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines to examine the intersection of race, power and media. Their research will be a resource for media organizations, academic institutions, foundations and others.

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  • 05/15/16--13:17: Best Voices of 2015 - 2016
  • MIJE Staff
    May 24, 2016

    From the very beginning, at the orientation weekend in July, the Oakland Voices 2015 correspondents shared a connection that no one could really explain. It started during a writing exercise and they just clicked. That bond would help them navigate stories about resilient family members, neighborhood businesses trying to make a difference, community organizers providing essential services and their own reactions to President Barack Obama’s executive order regarding gun violence and regulations. They organized two successful, informative community forums on displacement, Oakland’s major issue. They made discoveries about their own neighborhoods and took on complex issues such as gentrification and human trafficking. They highlighted delightful and unusual holiday celebrations in their communities. At the end of the program, they said they felt they had found or rediscovered their voices and plan to continue to tell the stories they see around them. Here are some of the highlights of their work. - Brenda Payton, Oakland Voices Coordinator

    They became advocates for healthy lifestyles. They reminisced about childhood inspirations. They celebrated the vibrancy of their evolving city, but with caution. They understand when change happens, people get left behind. The Sacramento Voices cohort for 2015-16 created a remarkably diverse body of work, writing about their South Sacramento communities with insight, depth and passion matched by no other media platform. Equally compelling was the quality of the writing. The pieces here reflect not just accumulated knowledge and snapshots of 10 lives lived in a specific place and time, but a unique community literary accomplishment of enduring journalistic craftsmanship. - Robert Graswich, Sacramento Voices Coordinator

    Tent City Oakland
    By Randy Filio
    Oakland Voices

    Old backboards, leaky roof, no wins and joy
    By Ricardo Lopez, Jr.
    Sacramento Voices

    From the very beginning, at the orientation weekend in July, the Oakland Voices 2015 correspondents shared a connection that no one could really explain. It started during a writing exercise and they just clicked. That bond would help them navigate stories about resilient family members, neighborhood businesses trying to make a difference, community organizers providing essential services and their own reactions to President Barack Obama’s executive order regarding gun violence and regulations.

    read more


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    MIJE Staff
    May 24, 2016

    From the very beginning, at the orientation weekend in July, the Oakland Voices 2015 correspondents shared a connection that no one could really explain. It started during a writing exercise and they just clicked. That bond would help them navigate stories about resilient family members, neighborhood businesses trying to make a difference, community organizers providing essential services and their own reactions to President Barack Obama’s executive order regarding gun violence and regulations.

    read more


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    MIJE Staff
    May 24, 2016

    They became advocates for healthy lifestyles. They reminisced about childhood inspirations. They celebrated the vibrancy of their evolving city, but with caution. They understand when change happens, people get left behind. The Sacramento Voices cohort for 2015-16 created a remarkably diverse body of work, writing about their South Sacramento communities with insight, depth and passion matched by no other media platform. Equally compelling was the quality of the writing.

    read more


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    MIJE Staff
    May 23, 2016

    Oakland Voices correspondents reflect on what they learned during the 10-month program.

    Video by Randy Filio

    Oakland Voices correspondents reflect on what they learned during the 10-month program.

    Video by Randy Filio


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  • 07/05/16--16:53: C-SPAN
  • Producer (part-time)
    Posted on: 
    July 5, 2016

    C-SPAN is seeking a part-time Producer for its radio station WCSP-FM. This person will be responsible for supporting the production of an air shift, including writing scripts, monitoring live and recorded events and researching and gathering necessary information to execute the radio program schedule. Bachelor’s degree in related field, minimum three years related experience, including radio production experience. Demonstrated knowledge of public affairs, public policy and American political history. Schedule includes evenings and weekends.

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  • 07/05/16--17:02: NorthJersey.com
  • Web Producer
    Posted on: 
    July 5, 2016

    NorthJersey.com is seeking a Web Producer to help publish breaking news and other content from The Record and other sources in various formats, including articles, photos, videos, audio and more. The Web Producer will use various web-based applications to categorize and optimize breaking news and other content, populate various sections of the site, and promote published material using Twitter, Facebook and e-mail newsletters. The web producer will also create documentation to facilitate the handing off of web site management from one desk to another at certain times of day and night.

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    By Martin G. Reynolds, Senior Fellow, The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education
    July 8, 2016

    By Martin G. Reynolds
    Senior Fellow
    The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education

    OAKLAND - The slayings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile have shaken the nation and brought to a head the festering tensions between people of color and law enforcement.

    Members of the press across the country are hard at work, thoughtfully reflecting how to make sense of this, and how best to cover the slayings of Spencer, in Louisiana, and Castile, in Minnesota, and the five Dallas police officers gunned down after a peaceful protest in that city Thursday night.
     
    We have all been shaken, but we have a job to do.

    [Read more]

    OAKLAND - The slayings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile have shaken the nation and brought to a head the festering tensions between people of color and law enforcement.

    Members of the press across the country are hard at work, thoughtfully reflecting how to make sense of this, and how best to cover the slayings of Sterling, in Louisiana, and Castile, in Minnesota, and the five Dallas police officers gunned down after a peaceful protest in that city Thursday night.
     

    read more


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    MIJE Staff
    July 12, 2016

    Minority workforce numbers have increased in several areas of broadcast media, but minority news personnel hiring has not kept pace with the overall population growth of non-white residents, the latest research on newsroom diversity by the Radio Television Digital News Association and Hofstra University shows.

    The annual survey found minorities in 23.1 percent of the jobs in newsrooms at non-Hispanic TV stations. In radio newsrooms, minority representation fell by 0.4 percent and remained especially low (5.6 percent) at commercial stations. Newspaper numbers are expected later this summer. Minorities comprise about 38 percent of the U.S. population.

    The complete report can be found at http://tinyurl.com/wamn16 and a sharable infographic on race and ethnicity in the newsroom at ow.ly/XiiS3026Aq2

    Minority workforce numbers have increased in several areas of broadcast media, but minority news personnel hiring has not kept pace with the overall population growth of non-white residents, the latest research on newsroom diversity by the Radio Television Digital News Association and Hofstra University shows.

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    MIJE Staff
    July 12, 2016

    MIJE asked veteran civil rights journalists Paul Delaney and Dorothy Gilliam about lessons from the 1960s that might be applied to journalists trying to make sense of the violence that convulsed America last week in Dallas, Falcon Heights and Baton Rouge.

    Delaney began his work with the Atlanta Daily World during the Civil Rights Movement and became a foreign correspondent and editor for The New York Times. Gilliam joined the Washington Post in 1961 as the first African American woman reporter hired by the paper. She wrote a Post Metro column for 19 years and serves as a MIJE board member.

    [Read more]

    MIJE asked veteran civil rights journalists Paul Delaney and Dorothy Gilliam about lessons from the 1960s that might be applied to journalists trying to make sense of the violence that convulsed America last week in Dallas, Falcon Heights and Baton Rouge.

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    By Reveal Staff
    August 2, 2016

    EMERYVILLE, Calif. – Today, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a national nonprofit newsroom in the San Francisco Bay Area, launched a project-based fellowship for journalists of color. The Reveal Investigative Fellowship will help strengthen a field in which diversity of background and perspective are more crucial than in any other corner of media.

    The yearlong fellowship, made possible with generous support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, emphasizes development of investigative reporting skills for early- to mid-career reporters and producers. It is intended for journalists currently employed by other outlets and includes on-site training at CIR’s Emeryville headquarters, ongoing coaching and mentoring, travel reimbursement and a $10,000 stipend to support the resulting text, audio, video or multimedia projects.

    Four fellows will be selected annually for each of the next three years, based on their proposals for investigative projects they want to pursue. The deadline for the first year is Sept. 12; applications can be found at bit.ly/Revealfellows.

    [Read more]

    EMERYVILLE, Calif. – Today, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a national nonprofit newsroom in the San Francisco Bay Area, launched a project-based fellowship for journalists of color. The Reveal Investigative Fellowship will help strengthen a field in which diversity of background and perspective are more crucial than in any other corner of media.

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    MIJE Staff
    August 7, 2016

    In the 1970s, Nancy Hicks Maynard and her husband, Robert Maynard, knew how editors would respond when asked why they didn't hire black reporters: we can't find anyone qualified.

    So the Maynards devised a strategic push back. They asked editors for specific examples of journalistic qualifications that were beyond the capabilities of African Americans.

    "It gave us an incredible confidence that there was an integrity problem with the attempt to keep black journalists not only out of the business but out of the leadership," Hicks Maynard said.

    [Read more]

    In the 1970s, Nancy Hicks Maynard and her husband, Robert Maynard, knew how editors would respond when asked why they didn't hire black reporters: we can't find anyone qualified.

    So the Maynards devised a strategic push back. They asked editors for specific examples of journalistic qualifications that were beyond the capabilities of African Americans.

    "It gave us an incredible confidence that there was an integrity problem with the attempt to keep black journalists not only out of the business but out of the leadership," Hicks Maynard said.

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    MIJE Staff
    August 7, 2016

    Hillary Clinton wanted to make an impression upon the reporters, writers and editors at the National Association of Black Journalists and National Association of Hispanic Journalists Joint Conference in Washington Friday, Aug. 5.

    So she went straight to the source. She opened her speech with a quote from Robert C. Maynard.

    “Someone that I had the privilege of knowing, the late, great Bob Maynard, former owner of the Oakland Tribune, once said — and I’ll quote Bob — ‘It is in seeing ourselves whole that we can begin to see ways of working out our differences of understanding our similarities,’ and becoming a more cohesive nation,” Clinton said.

    [Read more]

    Hillary Clinton wanted to make an impression upon the reporters, writers and editors at the National Association of Black Journalists and National Association of Hispanic Journalists Joint Conference in Washington Friday, Aug. 5.

    So she went straight to the source. She opened her speech with a quote from Robert C. Maynard.

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    MIJE Staff
    August 8, 2016

    The UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism and the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism has earned the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication's 2016 Equity and Diversity Award. Dorothy Bland, a graduate of the Maynard Institute's Editing Program, is dean of the Mayborn School of Journalism and Graduate Institute Director. Bland credits the great team - faculty and staff - at the school for the award.

    The UNT Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism and the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism has earned the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication's 2016 Equity and Diversity Award. Dorothy Bland, a graduate of the Maynard Institute's Editing Program, is dean of the Mayborn School of Journalism and Graduate Institute Director. Bland credits the great team - faculty and staff - at the school for the award.


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    By Wilma Jean Randle
    August 25, 2016

    George E. Curry, journalist, editor, columnist, activist, educator, mentor and friend, died suddenly over the weekend from heart failure at his home in Maryland. The legendary Chicago Tribune reporter was 69. Among many appreciations of Mr. Curry's legacy is the following tribute by Wilma Jean Randle, a Maynard alumna. She wrote from Dakar, Senegal, where she works as an international media consultant:

    I could not believe the news... only because you can't expect something like that... But I know that all is God's will and George Curry did more in the time allotted to him than most of us can hope to do.

    He had this way of pushing (getting you) to do things that you didn't even know you had it in you to do.

    It is because of George that I got our Twin Cities Black Journalists chapter to start doing the high school journalism mentorship program in St. Paul when I was at the St. Paul Pioneer Press -- and then when I got to Chicago.

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    George E. Curry, journalist, editor, columnist, activist, educator, mentor and friend, died suddenly over the weekend from heart failure at his home in Maryland. The legendary Chicago Tribune reporter was 69. Among many appreciations of Mr. Curry's legacy is the following tribute by Wilma Jean Randle, a Maynard alumna. She wrote from Dakar, Senegal, where she works as an international media consultant:

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    By R.E. Graswich
    September 16, 2016

    By R.E. Graswich

    Two days after the Civil War battle of Antietam, as the bodies of more than 23,000 men lay rotting in the late September sun, a photographer named Alexander Gardner arrived at the Maryland battleground to make photojournalistic history.

    Gardner and an assistant worked among the dead for four days, making 70 photographs on glass plates to document the carnage. They transported the plates to New York, where Gardner's partner, Matthew Brady, created albumen prints. Several weeks later, Brady opened a photographic exhibition called "The Dead of Antietam" at his studio on Broadway.

    With an eye for financial opportunity that surpassed Gardner's photo-journalistic genius, Brady created a new art form. He sold the horrific images in various formats, from postcards to large prints bound in leather. For the first time in history, he brought the explicit human devastation of war home to the public.

    Brady shared no credit with Gardner -- the photographer's name was absent from Brady's prints and displays -- but the exhibition established the power and authority of battlefield photography and photojournalism.

    [Read more]

    Two days after the Civil War battle of Antietam, as the bodies of more than 23,000 men lay rotting in the late September sun, a photographer named Alexander Gardner arrived at the Maryland battleground to make photojournalistic history.

    Gardner and an assistant worked among the dead for four days, making 70 photographs on glass plates to document the carnage. They transported the plates to New York, where Gardner's partner, Matthew Brady, created albumen prints. Several weeks later, Brady opened a photographic exhibition called "The Dead of Antietam" at his studio on Broadway.

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    MIJE Staff
    September 20, 2016

    Diversity percentages from 733 newsrooms across the United States have been released by the American Society of News Editors. For the first time, the numbers provide newsroom diversity details in every state and community.

    To see the ASNE’s coverage of the data, please visit:

    http://asne.org/blog_home.asp?Display=2168

    Diversity percentages from 733 newsrooms across the United States have been released by the American Society of News Editors. For the first time, the numbers provide newsroom diversity details in every state and community.

    To see the ASNE’s coverage of the data, please visit:

    http://asne.org/blog_home.asp?Display=2168